Standards

I’m afraid I’m compromising mine. 

We started the year not knowing what we we’re doing. We kind of punted that first unit.

This second unit we took more time to plan exactly what we were going to teach. We lined up our standards, we organized our daily lessons around specific standards. Everything was nice and orderly.

So what happened, during the second unit each lesson is designed to teach a specific standard. That worked very well in the beginning, but now nearing the end of unit students can do math but they’re not really understanding math. They can all recite to me how to recognize a proportional relationship in a graph. They can all recognize a proportional relationship in a table. They all know the standard equation for a proportional relationship. The problem is they just don’t understand what any of that stuff to means.

When I start asking like students what does this letter mean in the equation or what does this number mean or what does this mean anytime they get angry at me ‘I don’t know what it means you just told me to put it there’. I’m falling into the trap of being a teacher I don’t like. Teaching to standards and modifying questions from the final. I’m saying this is how you solve these questions this is how you get to the answers but my students aren’t understanding math

Intentional Classrooms

Organization

This first part is already a couple of weeks old, but I get a bit busy and can’t get back to my writing.

A disorganized pile of folders on a shelf

A disorganized teacher leads to disorganized students

Another week done at the middle school. I’m trying to get back into the swing of things of teaching. I realize that as a person I really don’t have a lot of organization. I do have some, but I don’t. It is kind of funny. What I mean is I don’t have any sort of organization skills, but I learn them or steal them. Going back to decorating my classroom again, I had so much trouble with it, not because I thought I wanted it to look pretty, but what I really wanted was to create organization for my students

 

Now a month into the school year I am realizing that I don’t have a good system set up and that hurts me and my students because we, the students and I don’t know what to do next. This is very important a classroom setting. We need organization to fall back on for those times when we finish early or just need to change tracks.

 

Most classrooms it is the same, come in the class do bell work, finish bell work jump into worksheets  or a short teacher led session, or better yet come into class work on project, take the project and share it with class in this way, what do I do if I don’t know how to do the project, How do I just ask for help or learn something new without asking the teacher. Where can I get more information. How do I teach myself. How do I work with my peer. etc….. That is the system that I don’t have set up in my classroom.

 

(editor’s note, I’m glad to say I’m getting more organized, but I’m trying to be intentional about it. I’m trying to make something that works for me and enhances the learning of my students)

 

Edcamps

 

I love edcamps, free conference, free breakfast, free lunch, how can you not like that. Plus no boring speakers. What it is, is a bunch of educators who come together to talk education, except because we don’t know each other’s students we never fall into the teacher’s lounge trap of focusing on behaviors.

#bloodmooneclipse

#bloodmooneclipse

EdcampIllinois (Schedule and collaborative notes here) was hosted by Maple Middle School in Northbrook. Some new folks organizing things and they did a great job. My favorite session was the Breakout Edu session. The game is simple, lock a box with three or more locks that use a variety of changeable codes to open. Set clues around the room, and the object is to get into the box before time runs out. Locks can be opened with numbers, words, or patterns so that students can test math, English, or whatever. (Not to mention the great team building exercise).

 

The next weekend was EdcampChicago. I’ve been going to this edcamp since the beginning and even helped organize a few over the years. (Schedule and collaborative notes). The first session for me was How to use twitter and blogs to inspire math. For most of the hour it was just me and another teacher so we had a great time-sharing people we follow on twitter and blogs.

 

My second session was Building a Culture of learning. Awesome stuff here. Because of this conversation I’ve been doing “My Favorit Know” as part of my warm up,  it has been great. All I do is take a picture of a common mistake from yesterday’s exit slip and put it into my presentation, then as a class ask why that was such a common mistake, or what s/he might have been thinking. We talked of ways to build a growth mindset and build collaborative groups, but you can read about that in the notes above.

 

I finished the session by attending a flipping the math classroom and makerspaces in the middle school. Oh, and winning a $500 document camera. Thanks Lumens.

 

It has been a busy few weeks at school (and on the weekends) I just haven’t had much time to write and reflect. I will do better and keep posting about once a week. The one thing I want to do is to be more intentional about what and how I make changes. I’m very good at following plans, and I’m very good at stumbling through life pretending I have a sense of direction, what I’m not always good at is purposefully planning so that a specific outcome is achieved. Yet, this is the basis of a lesson plan/unit plan.

Time to turn up the professionalism.

 

My Week in Technology Integration – Success Story

Good Advice

 


“Learn a new skill, take a break.” Advice from the longest-serving teacher in her building. “Kids need a bit of down time to process the skill they just learned, don’t force them to practice over and over until they hate it.”

 

The Freshman English class is almost finished with Romeo and Juliet. From my 30 minutes in the class it seems the students have done:

  • Active reading
  • Guided questions,
  • Discussions (online and offline)
  • A movie,

Can we cover this play from any different angle? Maybe they need a Google survey?   Seriously, they were better at decoding Shakespeare than me.

 

I created a list of tech tools to use in the classroom, I know it seems long, but it is barely a fraction of the stuff created for teachers. Please, take a look.

https://sites.google.com/a/rbchs.com/technology-integration/teacher-tools

Success story

 


Almost three years ago when I started this job. One of my first mistakes was telling a teacher she was using technology wrong. The next day her principal called and gave me an earful.

 

Luckily for me, she asked for some help putting spelling words on the web. We talked about options and ended up meeting every week after school talking technology and education.

 

Each week she had a list of questions and we usually never got past the third question, getting sidetracked not by the technology, but by how it integrates with teaching. She is now the proud owner of a grade level website designed to enhance learning. More importantly she is more comfortable trying new things in her classroom.

 

This week she introduced a tech tool to her building staff. She didn’t teach the tool, she taught a lesson using the tool.

Picture of computer, laminated card, and worksheet

I love the combination of tools to meet all needs

 

Way back when, she was asking the computer to teach, afraid to interact too much with a tool she didn’t understand. Today she teaches using technology. Is she a computer expert and able to fix your computer? No, she is a teacher who uses technology as a tool.

 

I seem to have a bit of dust in my eye now. Enjoy your Memorial Day weekend.

My Week in Tech Integration – Formative Assessment

Classroom Action

Several teachers have been using https://www.frontrowed.com/ during RTI. A great way to get that math practice in while working with a small group.

All of these researched based help usually say something like students who put in 75 minutes a day have shown improvement in math. Well if you practice 75 minutes a day on math of course you are going to get better. That isn’t to say the program is not useful, just that it is not trans-formative. It is a tried and true practice with just a bit of an edge because the work adapts to the level of the student instantaneously.

 

There are of course many similar programs out there, depending on what you want at a teacher could determine the tool you use. However, all should have at least some way to sign in and track the students, so that we know if they are actually learning or not.

 

Put your favorite tool in the comments or go to this survey and put it there. Some of my favorites are:

mangahigh.com

https://www.khanacademy.org/

 

Presentations to students – getting interactive

Wouldn’t it be nice to integrate formative assessment into your regular teaching? I know it’s easy a quick half sheet of paper and boom an exit slip. But then you have to grade everything and what if they didn’t understand the first thing you said and so were lost for the entire class period.

Some folks will create a quick Google form (like the one above, you can add videos as well) then use something like flubaroo to automatically grade it. The problem is that is still separating the discussion from the assessment.

 

Enter the web app Blendspace. It is a product one of the elementary teachers showed me Wednesday. It is a very simple way to add content and make quick multiple choice quizzes. Students don’t need an email to sign up so it is appropriate for the elementary crowd.

 

However, the questions are limited to multiple choice and sometimes you want students to be able to write or draw and answer. So here is a list of a few similar tools. Nearpod, PearDeck, Socrative, SmartBoard clickers, Classflow, and Junoed.

 

Of course the middle school teachers noticed the educreations app. Similar to the Show Me app and the Doceri app (more of a presentation tool). All of these are iPad apps which require an iPad and a way to get the iPad onto your projector, which can be done with Air Server.

 

Stuff from the web

Portfolio defense to graduate high school

From Envision academy charter schools. http://www.envisionschools.org/

Cool blog I found two great posts.

https://anethicalisland.wordpress.com/2015/03/20/how-do-you-choose-good-online-sources/

https://anethicalisland.wordpress.com/2014/11/07/personalize-my-learning-please/

 

Most people will like and probably use the first one right away, but the second one is great for technology. When you start asking “How do I create curriculum with multiple ways to learn the same content?” My mind goes immediately to technology. I might share one way to learn content in class and then offer a couple of youtube videos on my web site for further help. So when students don’t quite get what I explained in class they don’t have to rewatch my same lecture a million times and hope it finally sinks in, they can watch alternative explanations and hopefully one of those sticks.

 

Cool kindergarten classroom

Technology in the classroom

Phila. Teachers on Capitol Steps, Wash., D.C.,...

Phila. Teachers on Capitol Steps, Wash., D.C., 5/13/11 (LOC) (Photo credit: The Library of Congress)

 

My thoughts on a Linked In discussion that is finally getting interesting.

 

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE BEST WAYS TO MOTIVATE RELUCTANT TEACHERS TO UPDATE THEIR PEDAGOGY WITH INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES?

 

I tend to think the problem is effective evaluation of teachers. Until recently that meant principal observations which meant a dog and pony show. Currently, the most voiced other alternative is the VAM or test results Both models encourage a conservative classroom squarely aimed at simple specific goals.
To get teachers motivated to incorporate technology into lessons in meaningful ways means to value that as a goal. To somehow incorporate pedagogical use and technological infusion into the evaluation of teachers without it actually being a box checked on a form.

 

 

 

What are your thoughts?

 

 

 

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